Author Topic: Train spotting  (Read 12442 times)

Ray Harrison

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #11 on: January 02, 2014, 01:51:25 PM »
Train Spotting that takes me back. Remember those 'Ian Allen' books with all the train numbers listed ? Tyseley was my spot. With the sheds on one side and the main London Line passing through such happy days. We had names for different engines, Tankers, Matchboxes and Double Headers on The Main. My ambition was to see The GWR flagship engine King George V. Someone spread a rumour that it was to pass through one Saturday Morning . I got up to Tyseley about 8 am . It was a pea souper of a morning. Couldn't see a hand in front of your face. The Flying Scotsman King George V even Lady Godiva on White Horse could have very well passed through I'll never know.
Did eventually see the dear old King George V even stood on the footplate that must have been 60 years later and not at dear old Tyseley but a the Swindon Railway Museum . He who waits......
I went to York just over a year ago with the wife on a coach trip we were supposed to have a whole day in York , My plan was to slope off to the train Museum . All went wrong, driver got lost several times !.stopped for a meal. finished up we only got 2 hours in York, had to stay with the wife . what a bummer.
BUD

blane

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2014, 04:05:18 PM »
I went to York Train Museum several years back,me and three mates,just for a day out.Found the Smith's Bar in the Museum and tried to drink it dry.The best bitter I'd ever tasted. O0 O0 O0

planetmalc

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2014, 05:23:22 PM »
My ambition was to see The GWR flagship engine King George V.
 
You were unlucky because in the mid-to-late 50's King George V was common at Tyseley; I used to spot just up the line at Small Heath and saw it loads of times.    If you spotted for long enough you'd see most of the Kings on that line, but there were several that never seemed to put in an appearance  -  King John for instance.    All the rare ones seemed to be shedded at Plymouth(Laira).    There was a great place for spotting just up the line near Bordesley Park Road, where you could see all the Tyseley/Small Heath stuff, plus the LMS stuff on the line that ran past the Blues' ground, but you had to trespass to get to it. O0   
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nathan

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2014, 04:07:30 AM »
hi ray
the top of landor street i think was brickyard crossing i have a pic some where i will post when i come across it.
nath

cocacolakid

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2014, 12:06:08 PM »
As the subject of train spotting has come up again, I was wondering if anyone has a picture/photo of Carol's Cafe at Tamworth in the  1950s, either pictures of the inside or the outside?   Those of you who spotted at Tamworth in the 50s will remember the cafe, it was a large wooden building and was in the driveway to the low level part of Tamworth station. Thanks.
                                                                                                                    Malc.
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potblack

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2014, 04:51:13 PM »
I used to go spotting at Tamworth and Wolverhampton but this would about 1947.
Happy days but no photos - Sorry Malc.

trapio

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2014, 07:57:06 PM »
Ray,

Yup, that was 'kid's stuff'' - after a while, I went to London, for Festival of Britain in 1951, later crossed it and down to Dover - mingled with a group of others I'd met - accidently on purpose - on train, got on ferry, and eventually stopped by Belgian police in Comines on French border - it was a scuffed painted line in the street (market town it seemed) - had a foot in each (country) and did 180 jumps till the cop asked me something (I suppose - I couldn't understand) - he took back me over to French police who got a woman - had a great time - plenty of good food  - own room for the night, escorts from various fuzz back to home - where the local police rang the old siren bell - lovely sound that.   Hadn't been reported 'lost' and away 2 nights - mom got a grilling I think - when the police left the front door, I was over the back wall for another night - it was summer hols O0
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Spud

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2014, 11:23:54 AM »
Glad that Planetmac put me out of my misery about my trainspotting days and my quest to spot King George V. Sounds as if I was a  bit too early to see it. By the Mid 50s I was at work and my trainspotting days over. But it was fun while it lasted.
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Joewoen

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2014, 03:14:51 PM »
I remember an old boy telling me that the railway men in Saltley were called the Saltley seagulls, because they operated the sea-side specials.  :)

Ray Harrison

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2014, 04:33:47 PM »
I remember an old boy telling me that the railway men in Saltley were called the Saltley seagulls, because they operated the sea-side specials.  :)
they did think they were something special.
BUD

nathan

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2014, 09:02:16 AM »
I think there was a film called time bomb made at the railway sidings landor street , with Glen ford in 1953
any one got more info on this
nath