Author Topic: Train spotting  (Read 12385 times)

Ray Harrison

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2014, 09:21:51 AM »
I think there was a film called time bomb made at the railway sidings landor street , with Glen ford in 1953
any one got more info on this
nath
I saw the film ,don't know were it was filmed all the sidings looked the same ,might well have been there.
BUD

roy one

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2014, 09:22:58 AM »
removed. (December 2008)


Time Bomb / Terror on a Train (US)

Time Bomb FilmPoster.jpeg

Directed by
Ted Tetzlaff

Produced by
Richard Goldstone

Written by
Kem Bennett

Starring
Glenn Ford
Anne Vernon
Maurice Denham

Music by
John Addison

Cinematography
Freddie Young

Editing by
Frank Clarke
Robert Watts

Studio
MGM

Release dates
1953

Running time
73 min. (UK) / 72 min. (US)

Country
United Kingdom

Language
English

Time Bomb is a 1953 British-made MGM post-war thriller film written by Kem Bennett and directed by Ted Tetzlaff. It starred Glenn Ford and Anne Vernon. In the US it was released under the title Terror on a Train.

Plot[edit]

In the English city of Birmingham, Railway Police Constable Charles Baron (John Horsley) is involved in a confrontation with a man believed to be a local vagrant. The man gets away, but he is soon found out to have been a saboteur, who has left a suitcase full of detonators and bomb-making components at the railway yard. Police realise that the man was attempting to sabotage a trainload of sea mines, destined for the Royal Navy Yard at Portsmouth. The train is stopped as soon as possible in case an explosion is imminent, but a residential area is nearby and the police have to evacuate local residents.

The local authorities get in contact with former World War Two Royal Canadian Engineers bomb disposal Major Peter Lyncort (Glenn Ford), who is living in the city with his Parisian French wife Janine (Anne Vernon) and working for Anglo-Canadian Machine Tool Co., Ltd. Lyncort agrees to help, when the city's Railway Police security chief Jim Warrilow (Maurice Denham) visits. Lyncort's wife is not there, as she had walked out on him after their tenth fight in just one month.

Lyncort begins opening the trainload of mines one by one. They are hollow and a small explosive charge hidden inside any one could explode the whole train. The work is slow as well as dangerous, and Warilow joins in as Lyncort's assistant. They find an explosive charge and Lyncort disarms it.

Meanwhile the police plan to catch the saboteur in Portsmouth, in case he goes there to see the fruits of his labours, like an arsonist who stays at the scene of his crime. Constable Baron drives to the railway station in Portsmouth. He recognizes the suspect, who is apprehended, they are flown by Royal Navy helicopter back to Birmingham, and taken to the stopped train. Lyncort tells him the bomb has been disarmed, but the saboteur becomes agitated. There is a second bomb and it is due to go off at any moment, killing them all and devastating the neighbourhood. However, it has a chemical fuse, whose timing may be somewhat inaccurate.

Janine, meanwhile, remains unaware of all this. Coming home at 3 am to make up with Lyncort, she finds their home empty and starts making phone calls to all the local hospitals, fearing Lyncort has been involved in an accident. Eventually, Janine finds out where her husband is and arrives just in time to see him find the second bomb. He throws it away from the train and it explodes harmlessly in mid-air. They walk away, holding each other closely, as the movie ends
each day is a blessing and I bless each day when it comes

Joewoen

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2014, 03:02:30 PM »
Cheers Nathan and Roy.


This film can be placed in the TV and film thread.  :)

Terry B

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2014, 04:17:02 PM »
I was a Great Western spotter only. We'd walk (my brother and myself) or cycle to Hall Green and get children's returns to Snow Hill in the days of steam trains. I remember those tickets well - they were the full adult ticket cut diagonally with scissors!
 
If we were lucky, we'd get a through train but occasionally, we'd have to change at Tyseley. That wasn't as bad as it seems as Tyseley was a busy GWR shed and we'd see all manner of locos coming and going - a spotter's delight!
 
We'd then pass through Small Heath and Bordesley and pass Moor Street which in those days branched off to the left and was a dead end with a traverser to move the engine to a mid track. We'd then pass into the tunnel, going under Great Western Arcade and enter Snow Hill, usually on platform 5/6. We'd then spend the best part of the day at the northern end of platform 7 with our sandwiches (usually eaten by 11am!), watching trains approaching from Wolverhampton, Dudley or Stourbridge Junction. The diesel railcars were also busy, making their way to Dudley, taking people on visits to the zoo. That's what we thought anyway.
 
I used to marvel at the guards on platform 7/8 - the London bound train platform - who'd be standing a good few feet away from their carriage door to see the driver, wave their flag, blow their whistle and then walk briskly to the carriage door, entering it when the train was moving. I wonder if any of them ever missed their train!
 
I also remember the machine by the clock on platform 8 which would print an aluminium strip with letters on it of your name or whatever you dialed and stamped - all for a penny! I never worked out what the strip was used for!
 
The Old Snow Hill was indeed a magical place, and nothing like the modern imitation.

cocacolakid

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2014, 05:04:12 PM »
Terry B...
 
The metal strip you printed out  at Snow Hill Station was meant to be fixed to your suitcase, to identify that it belonged to you.
 
                                                                                                                                    Malc.
Every day is a gift, that's why they call it the present.

Ray Harrison

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #27 on: January 05, 2014, 05:49:44 PM »
I was a Great Western spotter only. We'd walk (my brother and myself) or cycle to Hall Green and get children's returns to Snow Hill in the days of steam trains. I remember those tickets well - they were the full adult ticket cut diagonally with scissors!
 
If we were lucky, we'd get a through train but occasionally, we'd have to change at Tyseley. That wasn't as bad as it seems as Tyseley was a busy GWR shed and we'd see all manner of locos coming and going - a spotter's delight!
 
We'd then pass through Small Heath and Bordesley and pass Moor Street which in those days branched off to the left and was a dead end with a traverser to move the engine to a mid track. We'd then pass into the tunnel, going under Great Western Arcade and enter Snow Hill, usually on platform 5/6. We'd then spend the best part of the day at the northern end of platform 7 with our sandwiches (usually eaten by 11am!), watching trains approaching from Wolverhampton, Dudley or Stourbridge Junction. The diesel railcars were also busy, making their way to Dudley, taking people on visits to the zoo. That's what we thought anyway.
 
I used to marvel at the guards on platform 7/8 - the London bound train platform - who'd be standing a good few feet away from their carriage door to see the driver, wave their flag, blow their whistle and then walk briskly to the carriage door, entering it when the train was moving. I wonder if any of them ever missed their train!
 
I also remember the machine by the clock on platform 8 which would print an aluminium strip with letters on it of your name or whatever you dialed and stamped - all for a penny! I never worked out what the strip was used for!
 
The Old Snow Hill was indeed a magical place, and nothing like the modern imitation.
Good memories of Snow hill I printed outmy nane several times on that machine who knows why?. The whole station seemed special seemed cleaner  inside the coaches nicer and best of all a Five Boys chocolate machine .
BUD

nathan

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2014, 09:32:28 AM »
lms only for me they didn't make you pay to go on the platform at new street.
nath

planetmalc

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2014, 04:16:17 PM »
lms only for me they didn't make you pay to go on the platform at new street.
nath
 
I used to nip into New Street every weekday evening on my way home from school to watch 'the Glasgow' come in at 17.10hrs.    Usually pulled by a Scot, but there was an occasional treat when it'd be a Brit instead. O0
There's no B/S on Planet Malc.

Ray Harrison

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2014, 04:45:53 PM »
 
I used to nip into New Street every weekday evening on my way home from school to watch 'the Glasgow' come in at 17.10hrs.    Usually pulled by a Scot, but there was an occasional treat when it'd be a Brit instead. O0
You See we always like to see the best /fastest train of the day. I am all for progress and looking forward to the new High speed rail system to come in, We must be the only country in Europe that does not have a high speed system and we invented trains ,bring it on.
BUD

nathan

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2014, 09:51:30 PM »
Saturday morning had to take my two sisters and younger brother to the pictures at the kingston before going new street. and if mom was still at work take them over the tip to brickyard crossng to do spotting.
as i write this i am looking at my display of three duchesess ,three jubilee's , one scott ,one f4 , one black 5 ,and two tanks . in
N gauge
nath

4orchard

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Re: Train spotting
« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2014, 10:00:11 PM »
 I remember as a lad dashing home from school ,and climbing onto the railway embankment in Cato St north
at around lunch time to see the Manchester to Bournemouth express go by I think it was called the pines express although I don't know where the name come from .we were always putting coins on the line for them to be squashed by the train .highly. Illegal and stupid as one of our colleagues tragically found when he got killed at the top of.the street near the jct of nechalls place can anyone else remember the incident?
David R