Author Topic: Hamstead Village  (Read 24058 times)

Turbo79

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Re: Hamstead Village
« Reply #77 on: December 19, 2016, 03:30:20 AM »
Hi everybody, been to see my great aunt Lil today and it turns out my grandmothers side of family actually all lived old Walsall Road, does anybody remember or knew of the Westwood family in hamstead, having trouble tracing back with the Westwoods, I believe my grandmother lived at 44 old Walsall Road and her cousins (the Bradley's including great aunt Lil) moved a few times but ended up at 14 old Walsall Road, great aunt Lil is 90 next year and was born 120 back row, just off old Walsall Road maybe this when houses were back to back??

Turbo79

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Re: Hamstead Village
« Reply #78 on: December 19, 2016, 03:40:03 AM »
Whoops sorry forgot to type names in, my grandmother was vera Westwood and she had 3 brothers, Dennis, Eric and Kenneth, although Kenneth died quite young, I think some of Dennis and Eric descendants are still alive who would be my late father's cousins but I have no names to go on

townie

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Re: Hamstead Village
« Reply #79 on: June 13, 2017, 01:32:19 PM »
All the people from Hamstead do you remember a pub on the old Walsall road just before the bridge? There is a photo on the old pubs of brum topic (reply 2271) Thank you. 
Was it a vision, or a waking dream?

countrylad

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Re: Hamstead Village
« Reply #80 on: July 11, 2017, 11:58:07 AM »
This thread has bought back a few memories of the chats I used to have with my old dad as a kid about Hamstead colliery in the war years. Dad and the family had moved from the south Wales valley's - Blaen Llechau, Ferndale and Meardy in the mid 30's and started at Bakelite, Tysley.  There was still a large Welsh contingent at Bakelite up to the 80's


He recounted, a 'man' came to the pits in south Wales and one day he  (the man) was at the pit head when the shift finished. The man was representing factories in Birmingham and offered many of the miners jobs in Brum.    A bus was laid on and many of them went to Brum and stayed in 'rooms' in Smallheath, Sparkbrook and Sparkhill, the women stayed in the valleys a while longer before moving to Brum.


Just after the outbreak of the second world war, Dad was called-up and as an ex Collier a reserved occupation. He went to Hamstead. He spoke fondly of the people of Hamstead. He was never sure though about being back down the pit, was it better than going off to fight? He had no choice, he had to go down the pit but he survived where others didn't.


He would tell me about the pit ponies and how some of them didn't see the light of day for weeks, how he felt sorry for them and would give them spare food, on the rare occasions that there was anything spare. Some ponies would get seriously injured and have to be put to sleep down the pit by exploding a detonator in the pony's ear. However, some ponies did retire. 


He also told me about an accident in Hamstead pit, where a man got killed from being caught up in the pit winding gear. Not sure if anyone would remember this as it is almost 80 years ago.


At the end of the war Dad was back at Bakelite.