Author Topic: Industrial Birmingham  (Read 11274 times)

Ian Dalziel

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #231 on: November 16, 2019, 03:55:27 PM »
Alloy rims losing air - I'm having to pump up my daughter's tyres almost weekly, no punctures, new valves and rims refurbished, still losing air, I thought I would try an aerosol puncture repair (which you get on new small cars these days instead of a spare wheel) anyone tried this as a remedy?
Peg.
P.S. Based on my daughter's experience, give me boring steel rims everytime. To buy steel rims and re-fit tyres: 75 each wheel!
P.P.S. In days gone by when I had a similar problem I would fit an inner-tube, my friendly tyre dealer says you can't do that anymore with modern tyres.


Peg, I don't think you were given entirely the correct information. I think you can fit an inner-tube into a tubeless tyre, in fact I have done it myself. However you have to make sure that inside the tyre and rim, there is nothing to puncture the tube (like a rough surface or pressure sensor) and also be aware that, in the case of a puncture, tubed tyres can deflate much more rapidly than tubeless. I used to carry a spare tube  and tyre levers with me when travelling abroad, just in case I could not locate a spare tyre.
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Spud

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #232 on: November 16, 2019, 05:31:56 PM »
Formula 1 wheels are usually made using Magnesium I have seen them being made using the Sand Casting Method this was in a company in Kent which I used when I was at work. Magnesium is of course inflammable.
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Peg Monkey

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #233 on: November 17, 2019, 05:11:18 PM »
Day 1 at the apprentice school - we were told we needed to purchase a toolkit, the cost 4, a week's wages!.....
Peg.   
Searching through my toolbox recently I came across another item that I purchased shortly after starting my Birfield Apprenticeship in 1965 with Salisbury Transmission Ltd, an adjustable setsquare, which I purchased from The Midland Educational shop, great store, now long gone.
The item still performs as well as it did on the day I purchased it, but is clearly out of fashion - it was mainly used on drawing boards with just a vertical motion rule.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #234 on: November 17, 2019, 05:19:25 PM »

Peg, I don't think you were given entirely the correct information. I think you can fit an inner-tube into a tubeless tyre, in fact I have done it myself. However you have to make sure that inside the tyre and rim, there is nothing to puncture the tube (like a rough surface or pressure sensor) and also be aware that, in the case of a puncture, tubed tyres can deflate much more rapidly than tubeless. I used to carry a spare tube  and tyre levers with me when travelling abroad, just in case I could not locate a spare tyre.
Thanks, Ian-I'm going to check this remedy our further, I've decided against the aerosol can, they're intended for a flat tyre, I'm worried the rubber-based solvent could block the valve and make a bad situation even worse.
Peg. 

mw0njm

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #235 on: November 17, 2019, 06:54:48 PM »
Formula 1 wheels are usually made using Magnesium I have seen them being made using the Sand Casting Method this was in a company in Kent which I used when I was at work. Magnesium is of course inflammable.
my da worked in a factory/foundry, bromford lane erdington,making cosmos mag alloy wheels. that magnesium was horrible stuff. after casting they went away to be heat treated to harden them.
Regards pete

mw0njm

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #236 on: November 17, 2019, 07:01:55 PM »
Thanks, Ian-I'm going to check this remedy our further, I've decided against the aerosol can, they're intended for a flat tyre, I'm worried the rubber-based solvent could block the valve and make a bad situation even worse.
Peg.
i used that stuff once peg and it wrecked the tyre and valve,plus i had to pay to get it off the rim,before they fitted the new tyre. that turned out a very expensive puncture
Regards pete