Author Topic: Industrial Birmingham  (Read 3220 times)

townie

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #44 on: March 05, 2019, 08:12:24 PM »
Peg I take it you didn't see much of life growing up in your late teens when everyone was nightclubbing. But fair play to you for getting a mortgage and house, all I got was a council house but I had a great time growing up. 
Was it a vision, or a waking dream?

Peg Monkey

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #45 on: March 06, 2019, 11:03:04 PM »
Peg I take it you didn't see much of life growing up in your late teens when everyone was nightclubbing. 
Not so! - Grab a Granny Night every Thursday at The Rank - doesn't get much better than that! Right?! Back on topic: Where did you earn a crust to fund your lifestyle of fun and frolic?


My wage when I started at the apprentice school was 4 per week with a bonus of upto 18/-, 4 was abysmal even in 1965 so I had my sights set on nothing less than the maximum bonus. I can't remember when it was first paid - it must have been a few weeks at least after I started work at the school because it was performance-related, including time-keeping, anyway I worked my socks off and when bonus' were declared I was gutted that I only got 12/6.
It was no consolation whatsoever that it was one of the highest bonuses paid - my mate only got 5/-.
I should have taken the instuctors to task but I wouldn't have said boo to a goose in those days.  :(

townie

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #46 on: March 06, 2019, 11:17:26 PM »
Peg when I was at working age 15 I could leave one job and start another the next day. In the early 70s I lived on town I didn't need to work. Somewhere on this forum I posted how life was, but I wouldn't change a thing. I don't think many on this forum would have lived on town, but they know all about it.   
Was it a vision, or a waking dream?

Peg Monkey

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #47 on: March 07, 2019, 11:42:56 PM »
Day 1 at the apprentice school - we were told we needed to purchase a toolkit, the cost 4, a week's wages! The school kindly purchased a toolkit for each of us and we repaid by instalments - these were deducted from our wages. I still have the toolkit 53 years on, like me it's retired, it's missing some items, unfortunately, (I know I've still got the dividers in my garage somewhere) anyway there is a pic attached with a sketch where the item is missing.
Peg.   

Peg Monkey

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #48 on: March 11, 2019, 09:11:29 AM »
As soon as we got our toolkits the first thing we had to do was etch our name on every item - essential to avoid fights over who owned what!
Peg O0

Peg Monkey

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #49 on: March 11, 2019, 04:55:03 PM »
Test pieces that we made at the apprentice school broadly fell into two catagories: the first: items that gave experience in a particular machining or other process (e.g. screw cutting by lathe), these had no purpose afterwards than to act as a reference item and for retention as a "proud work of art" and the second where the items fulfilled the same purpose as in the first catagory and in addition had a subsequent practical use, these consisted of a variety of items that could be used by the apprentice all through his career and a simple example of this is the depth gauge shown in the attachment.  O0
Peg.
P.S. The old feller needs a spot of WD40 on his rod to get him back in working order.


Peg Monkey

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Re: Industrial Birmingham
« Reply #50 on: March 14, 2019, 08:23:11 PM »
Down to experience - 1972, 2 years out of my apprenticeship and working in Production Enginnering, Salisbury Transmission (my employer) had just secured a prestigious order from the USA and initial machining trials were underway when my boss asked me to go and sort a problem out at the start of the gearbox manufacturing line. The tooling engineers had a mismatch between a milling machine and the cutter they were trying to fit to it, the solution: an adaptor, simple engineering solution, within an hour or so I had designed the part and it had been ordered and a few days later it came in, I shouldn't have heard anymore about it, but I did - foreman sent for saying you've messed up, adaptor fits the machine ok but the cutter wont marry up with the adaptor.
I checked my measurement and double checked the cutter - my meaurements were miles out and I couldn't understand it - there had to be a reason and of course there was - after much investigation I discovered a consultant engineer had been working on the  machine and when the cutter couldn't be fitted it took it away for use elsewhere and the cutter they tried to fit later was not the same one although everyone swore blind it was.
I vowed I would never be caught out again and in simlar circustances I took a photograph of the items in question - now a days with a phone camera it would be easier.
Ah well! That's Life!
Peg