Author Topic: trams trains and buses  (Read 1146 times)

Potomac

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #55 on: October 29, 2017, 09:47:53 PM »
Hello Roy,
I do try to verify my memories and stored knowledge with other published information.  I know this is not classified as a history forum but as you rightly point out someone who reads this thread will hope that it contains accuracy.  I am of the opinion that much of what is often quoted on some social media sites is pure conjecture.  Notwithstanding as one get older so the memory does play tricks from time to time and often rose tinted specs obscure facts.   ;D
best wishes,  Alan

roy one

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #56 on: October 29, 2017, 10:02:07 PM »

hi Potomac
                      but in away this is history of brum that's why I put the topic in old Birmingham because its our history of brum and if we do not get it down in print it could be lost this forum may close one day but all thats been posted will still be about in years to come O0
each day is a blessing and I bless each day when it comes

Potomac

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #57 on: October 29, 2017, 10:14:09 PM »
Carlisle Works was formed in 1920 and extended in 1924. It was in Carlisle Road, Edgbaston.  It dealt principally with the body of buses whereas Bearwood, it seems, were more into the mechanics.  In 1954. the year of the 'Reds' Golden Jubilee a new complex was built and named the Central Works, but was still affectionately known as 'Carlisle'.
The Birmingham & Midland Motor Omnibus Company aka Midland Red, started out in 1904.  It had a great history holding a unique place in the Uk's bus industry.  In fact both the BCT and Midland Red, for different reasons, were the most progressive, outside London, of bus operators.


I must add here that my interest in BCT ends when the WMPTE took over all the West Midland municipal buses and part of the Midland Red.   As for the Midland Red it was even less appealing (as was my local Devon General and Western & Southern National buses) when the National Bus Company stepped in in 1969.   I have little interest in the split up of the remainder in 1981.
best wishes,  Alan

Scipio

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #58 on: October 30, 2017, 10:20:22 AM »

now I think its time to give midlandred a thread  has far has I know it was made up of midred west midred north midred south it had a number of garages around the midlands  has kids we called the posh bus and it was one of the few bus company's that made its own buses I believe it was a place called Carlisleworks not to far from five ways but sadly it got broke up and sold off




 


As a kid, me and a couple of mates on the way back from the pictures on Saturday afternoon, used to creep into the midland red garage
in Sheepcote St get onto a bus access  the little storage box built in under the stairs , and pinch the rolls of blank tickets . So from Sheepcote St to William St where I lived we gave ourselves our own ticker tape reception . Strange thing though about Midland Red buses to me they seemed to have a smell of there own not a nasty smell , it was probably a mixture of diesel and something , if memory serves the fares used to be dearer than BCT , if we got on a midland red we thought we were travelling in style

Potomac

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #59 on: October 30, 2017, 11:47:58 AM »
The double decker is a type D9, introduced in 1960 with production of the type, with some modifications until 1966.  I gather nearly 350 were built.
The saloon (single deck) classified S14 first entered service in 1955.  A lot were built and there was also an S15, which was a superior riding quality bus ideally for the longer distance services for which the Midland Red were famous.  These vehicles were distinguishable by their black roofs. Midland Red developments never stood still, these buses in the picture were superseded by more advanced vehicles some of which were the direct result of the General Manager, D.M. Sinclairs long visit to North America in 1948.  You could travel from one side of the middle of England to another by Midland Red, they were not confined to the city of course.
Regarding the smell.  Now there was a distinctive fuel aroma appertaining the the older pre-war Midland buses.  Until the wartime deliveries, which were not built by the Red, fuel tanks were situated beneath the drivers cab.  The last petrol engined buses were built in 1936/7 but during the period 1942-1947 had replacement diesel engines fitted.
The fare structure, within the Birmingham city boundary was always higher.  An agreement to protect the cities transport system was in place.  Those who used Midland buses out side the city boundary usually had a more appropriate fare.
Midland Red also perpetuated the quaint bell system until pot WW2 from memory.  This was not the usual electric bell push most will be familiar with but a long rubber covered 'rope' type rigmarole fixed from the ceiling and tugged to to cause a striker to hit a bell in the drivers cab.  This was certainly the lower saloon arrangement: I don't recall whether it also operated in the upstairs deck.  It broke from time to time and the evidence for that was the knots tied in the rope.
best wishes,  Alan

Ian Dalziel

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #60 on: October 30, 2017, 12:17:30 PM »
Before the roller ticket machines, my recollection is that the conductors had a clipboard with rows of different priced tickets which they selected and then punched a hole with their ticket machine before handing the ticket to you.
It is often possible to turn a setback to an advantage.

roy one

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #61 on: October 30, 2017, 12:27:29 PM »
I'm not sure about this but did not mindlandred use a m/c called the setright or some thing like that
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frederick

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #62 on: October 30, 2017, 01:15:49 PM »
Myself and parents had many a ride on a Midland red bus from Navigation St to Stourport. I would always sit top deck front seat. Stourport was the terminus in those days that was up to 1966 I then had a car to travel in.
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Potomac

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #63 on: October 30, 2017, 01:18:31 PM »
Most bus companies originally had a ticket rack which contained ticket  values that were likely to be required for the route they were on.  They were inserted in a Bell Punch machine which made a hole in one side. or the other, of the ticket which indicated your direction of travel and if checked by an inspector whether you had overstayed your journey. ;)
These were superseded by TIM Machines, Setright and so on.
http://www.old-bus-tickets.co.uk/?cat=3
http://www.old-bus-tickets.co.uk/?cat=118


I am sure a search will provide other tickets used by both BCT and B&MMO plus the types of machine used over the long period they were in business.
best wishes,  Alan

JudithM

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #64 on: October 30, 2017, 01:28:39 PM »
have we come forward or backwards  in the 1940 trams got us about in Birmingham then they did away with the trams and replaced them with a bus  now we have a new kind of tram in Birmingham  I wonder if the day will come when this new kind of tram will go to the lickys

Would be nice - I could get it to work if it does  ;D
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roy one

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Re: trams trains and buses
« Reply #65 on: October 30, 2017, 01:46:08 PM »
this is a setright ticket m/c I beleve
each day is a blessing and I bless each day when it comes