Author Topic: British Cars  (Read 25745 times)

ironside

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #726 on: January 01, 2018, 04:26:33 PM »
Those G forces had to come from somewhere, when my mate dropped his foot down in his Jensen I'd be buried in the passenger seat.

Patriot

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #727 on: January 01, 2018, 09:47:44 PM »


Standard Flying 14.  1939-1948
I married Miss Right. I didn't know her first name was Always.

Edmund Fifield

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #728 on: January 01, 2018, 11:34:15 PM »
Whernt they lovely those old cars

frederick

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #729 on: January 02, 2018, 12:30:16 PM »
One of the the things you needed in the winter and they didn't have in the old cars was a heater. And having to empty your radiator in the frosty weather every night as there was no anti freeze in those days.
Failure to Prepare is to Prepare to Fail

ironside

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #730 on: January 02, 2018, 03:34:26 PM »
This car originated with a member of the Flowers brewing family (remember Stanley Unwin's Flowerykeg advert.) It was made in a corner of the Henry Meadows diesel engine factory in Wolverhampton. A couple of years ago I was talking to the grandson of Henry Meadows, he had a stand at the NEC Classic Car Show for Frisky cars. I do not have a connection with Wolverhampton, but there is not much that wasn't made there, this car is one of the six I know to.

Patriot

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #731 on: January 03, 2018, 09:05:11 PM »
Austin A90 Atlantic Sports Saloon.jpg
Austin A90 Atlantic.
2.6L
Chassis and running gear based on 1949 A70 Hampshire.
I married Miss Right. I didn't know her first name was Always.

countrylad

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #732 on: January 03, 2018, 10:08:39 PM »
Austin A90 Atlantic Sports Saloon.jpg
Austin A90 Atlantic.
2.6L
Chassis and running gear based on 1949 A70 Hampshire.
When I look at these old cars, I wonder how many had the panels beaten by hand, not so much pressed steel in those days.


I was talking to an old boy today. He had worked at Kings Norton Factory Centre in 1949 for what became the Forward Radiator company. He spoke about making some of the first Land Rover panels, and motorcycle petrol tanks. Was taught how to do sheet metal work. Interestingly, he said him and his friend signed up to the Army in 1951 and the trades unions at he factory were against this. He therefore broke his apprenticeship contract. He was drafted into the REME, posted to Egypt and he said he had a great time. Even talked about welding Scammel bumpers while using Barbed wire as welding rods. He also showed me some photos taken while he was out there, lovely interesting old boy.

Patriot

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #733 on: January 03, 2018, 10:24:30 PM »
When I look at these old cars, I wonder how many had the panels beaten by hand, not so much pressed steel in those days.

Austin Atlantic panels were machine pressed.
I married Miss Right. I didn't know her first name was Always.

Ian Dalziel

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #734 on: January 03, 2018, 10:47:44 PM »
Easily identified with it's 'cyclops' headlight.    O0
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Edmund Fifield

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #735 on: January 03, 2018, 11:24:16 PM »
They look like the old Citreon models some of them

countrylad

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Re: British Cars
« Reply #736 on: January 04, 2018, 09:23:36 AM »
Austin Atlantic panels were machine pressed.
Which factory was this carried out at?