Author Topic: Farm Street, Hockley  (Read 912 times)

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2018, 11:10:30 PM »
School Artefacts - Anyone know what happens to a school's important artefacts when it finally closes its doors? As far as Farm Street Shool is concerned it had a set of paintings (originals I think) in the lower (dining) hall depicting nursery rhymes, one in particular I remember: Jack Spratt Could Eat No Fat. The paintings, I guess 5 in total, about 4ft wide x  3ft high were treasured items, each school shutdown the caretaker was tasked with carefully boarding them up.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2018, 04:30:46 PM »
OH! I do like to be beside the seaside! I remember feeling a bit more grown up (now about 7) when were left to our own devices on arrival at our seaside trip destinations, Usually by train from Snow Hill (probably via Hockley Station) Rhyl and Llandudno I remember in particular - the latter very particulary; whilst on the beach  I was targetted by a seagull who had had a dodgy curry with the lads the night before - thankfully I only got his free gift on my hand.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2018, 11:06:17 PM »
Inter-school Sportsday - It was one fine day and a series of selection trials were being carried out in the lower playground at Farm St School for the forthcoming inter-school sportsday. Running, and the like competitvely, wasn't one of my strengths (still trying to find out if I've got one) but I did my best and low and behold I left everbody for dead in the hoop-race (I still think it was a stroke of luck), anyway I got selected to represent the school and do you know what? I came last (or very near) Ah Well! That's life.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2018, 11:18:36 AM »
Vehicle Breakers. Don't know if it's there now but in the late fifties there was a large vehicle breakers yard on the left at the end of Farm St as you looked in the direction of Hockley Brook. Now I'm probably about 8 or 9  and have been building go-carts for a little while (always a challenge when you are working with a budget of nil - so there was a lot of begging and re-cycling (especially wheels)) Anyway I looked at my cart one day and thought Do know what? Technology has moved on and I must do the same - speficially how the cart was steered.
Until then I had always adopted the tried and trusted (the 1956 Heaton St Go-cart Crash excepted) cord and feet method but I wanted to take my carts into the next century with steeringwheel steering.
I hadn't worked out the technicalities at that time but I thought a good place to start was getting hold of a steering wheel, all well and good but what if you've got no money?
I managed to get a few pennies together and made a trip to the breakers yard, a friendly guy met me at the gate and asked What can I do for you John? (Everybody was called John in those days) I explained I needed a steering wheel and he smiled, asked me to wait and disappeared into the yard, he returned a few minutes later with a steering wheel, I cautiously asked how much and he replied nothing you can have it for free.
I know what you are thinking, I bet he was delighted. Not quite.
The wheel was massive - nearly as big as I was, the breakers yard only dealt in lorries and buses and they pre-dated power assisted steering so all steering wheels on commercial vehicles were out of neccessity huge.
I didn't like to refuse the gift as he had gone to such trouble, so I took it and left, but when I go home I was forced to conclude things were not going to work out when the steering wheel is bigger than the cart.
As it happens I had a friend who lived next door to the breakers yard, so when the yard had closed I took the wheel back and dropped it over the wall.
I made a number of attempts to move to hi-tech steering without success, I could do it now, but it's nearly 60 years too late.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #15 on: July 28, 2018, 08:29:53 PM »
Baines? Opposite the vehicle breakers, corner of Farm St and (I think) Hunters Rd, was a small but perfectly formed cake shop - I think it was Baines but can't be sure, one thing is for sure, they did a fantastic range of cakes, one particularly memorable one: a sponge soaked in fruit juice and rolled in coconut - you'd call it lemon drizzle now - that's progress.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2018, 04:00:30 PM »
Summer vacations - Every summer vacation, when I was at Farm St School, my father took me and my mother for a two-week caravan holiday at Brean Down (near Weston-super-Mare), I considered my self fortunate, some of my friends were lucky to have just a week somewhere and some didn't go away at all - having said that, it would have been nice to have a change. 
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2018, 11:47:37 AM »
Fishing - I didn't inherit the gene. During my years at Farm St School my father was an avid fisherman and I regularly bullied him into taking me on his Sunday Fishing Trips (By coach to Ross-on-Wye, Tewkesbury and the like). I just remember it pouring down with rain all the time - but I'm sure that was not the reality.
Peg.


Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2018, 02:12:37 AM »
Old Farm St. - The following link http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=18&lat=52.4959&lon=-1.9081&layers=176&b=6 takes you to a mapsite which will be useful if you fancy taking a stroll along old Farm St (or anywhere in Birmingham for that matter). The map with the scale I find convenient is OS 25inch, 1892-1914.
Credit: Astoness Lyn brought this site to my attention.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Re: villa street hockley
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2018, 05:17:22 PM »
I was at Farm St School and about aged 9 when my career as a carol singer really took off.
It all started just before Christmas 1958 (my best guess) when my cousin. a few years older than me, invited me to join him and Jim (can't remember his real name) to form a trio of carol singers, Jim was a fantastic spoon player and I have to say even at aged 9 I thought  the plan to have the spoons as a musical accompaniment to Silent Night and the like was fundamentally flawed.
Anyway my cousin said it was tried and tested so I agreed.
When I saw Jim on the night of our first performance I felt really sorry for him, his family was very poor, wich was reflected in the state of his clothing, he was cross eyed and wore NHS wire-rimmed specs (yes I know John Lennon turned these into a fashion ikon but that was much later).
Anyway I thought we were just going door to door singing our carols but my cousin pointed out we would be much more productive if we sang at pub doors, which we did, all over Hockley.
Jim played his spoons like a demon, completetely drowning  out the dulcet tones of me and my cousin, which was just as well.
After a few bars we sent Jim in to take the collection, the sight of poor Jim brought tears to most people's eyes and this was reflected in their contributions, we made a packet.
Ah! Happy Days,
Peg.
Pubs on Farm St. - A historical question, but still one of considerable importance: Does anyone remember how many pubs there were on Farm St in the late 50's? My elder cousin, Ray, King of the Spoons, Jim, and myself were the gang of 3 carol singers who had their maiden gig at The Duke of Cambridge, late 50's. Ray chose the venue and I have to say looking back it was not an obvious choice. I don't remember there being many, if any, other pubs in Farm St at that time. We all lived near The Flat so a much better choice would have been to have that as the centre of operations, then the world would have been our oyster: The Bulls Head, The Brown Lion, The Abbey Vaults, The Great Western and The Hydraulic (don't know precisely where that was).
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2018, 03:03:54 AM »
Farm St School - c1958 Noele Gordon made me late for school! Senior threaders may remember the TV personality Noele Gordon who starred in the Classic(?!!) TV drama Crossroads when it first started, but before that she hosted a mid-day chat show called Lunch Box which I think ran from 1.00 - 1.30pm each weekday. In those days my mother worked full-time (I was 9, or thereabouts) but on those occasions when there was someone at home I went home for lunch, it took abot 20 mins to walk from school to my home in Heaton St, Lunch Box must have been showing a feature which I was particulary interested in because I stayed to watch it until the end: 1.30 when I should have been back at school for the afternoon session. That afternoon was arithmetic - fractions and Mrs Jones the teacher was singularly unimpressed with my reason for being late: I needed to watch Lunch Box until the end.
Mrs Jones was Welsh and my father was Welsh so I tried to exploit a common connection on a number of occasions when I thought it might get me out of trouble - did it ever work? NO.
And they say honesty is the best policy!
Peg.
P.S. I think the Jerry Allen Trio provided the music on Lunch Box.

Edmund Fifield

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Re: Farm Street, Hockley
« Reply #21 on: September 04, 2018, 01:02:49 PM »
PEG.in my wife's school days she was chosen to go to the T V Studios by Aston Cross and interview her for a project at school.