Author Topic: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.  (Read 164 times)

Peg Monkey

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Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« on: June 09, 2019, 05:54:21 PM »
Salisbury Transmission Ltd., Birch Road, Witton, Birmingham 6. The company was established in 1939, an off-shoot of Salisbury Axle, USA and manufactured axles, differentials and gears for the automotive industry. It was originally part of the Birfield Group which included Hardy Spicer (Birmingham) and Laycock Engineering (Sheffield), the group was acquired by GKN in 1966. I started at the company in 1965 and there must have been 500 employees at the time, shortly after that an assembly factory was purchased at the top of Bromford Lane and then another on the Tyburn Road.  I worked at the company until 1974. The company is now known as Dana Traction Technologies (Europe). My association started with the company in June 1965.........
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2019, 06:16:17 PM »
.... My association started with the company in June 1965.........
Peg.
My introduction to the world of interviews was very much a baptism of fire when I applied for a Joseph Lucas Apprenticeship, the selection process consisted of a full day (9 until well past 5.00) of tests and interviews and I wasn't offered a place but I was then combat-ready for the next interview at Salisbury, thankfully it was a far more relaxed affair. The Asst. HR manager conducted the interview and he was so impressed with my work samples from my school metalwork classes that he invited his lady assistant in to the office to view my handywork. Sadly the only surviving item is a tea caddy spoon shown on the attachment, I've produced sketches representing some of the other items that I showed at the interview.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2019, 10:50:35 PM »
I got offered a 5 year Technical Apprenticeship subject to satisfactory CSE grades, these were due to be published sometime in August 1965. My Grade 4 maths was disappointing in the extreme but my grade 2s for technical drawing, metalwork and physics might have carried me through. The first year would be spent at the Birfield Apprentice School on the Hardy Spicer factory site, Chester Rd, Erdington starting September 1965.
Peg.


vamann

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2019, 08:43:10 PM »
We used to buy Dana Spicer ceramic clutches as replacement to the original non ceramic clutch.  Certainly lasted longer but flywheel faceplate wear was one of the drawbacks.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2019, 12:12:41 PM »
Birfield Apprentice School 1965-66. Based on the Hardy Spicer Factory Site, apprentices came from Birfield Group Companies all over the midlands, 4 others with me from Salisbury Transmission, most memorable thing was the mountain of jam donuts freshly baked in the Hardy Spicer canteen kitchen every morning and afternoon and served at the 10.00am and 3.00pm breaks.
Happy Days.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2019, 08:30:55 PM »
My year at the Apprentice School finished in September 1966 (or thereabouts) and then it was back to the main Salisbury Factory in Witton where I would spend the next 2 years working on the various sections of the factory, my first posting was on the Hub and Miscellaneous Line where I was assigned to a toolsetter......
Peg.
P.S. It was the dawn of The Mini Skirt, Ah! Happy Days!

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 08:50:14 PM »
Salisbury Apprentices were required to act as factory tour guides - usually school parties.
Peg,

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #7 on: Today at 04:57:49 PM »
I've always taken my full lunch-break entitlement, often going for a long walk sometimes eating my sandwiches on the way around, if the weather was bad I would still go out usually to a nearby cafe, one was on Witton island (we're now talking, I guess, c1973) which was about 10 mins or so walk from the factory, it was just a converted terraced house the front section having 4 or 5 tables and the same at the rear, the Villa ground was only minutes walk distant and I was enjoying a coffee in the front section one Monday, where the serving counter was, when who should walk in but the young talented Villa keeper Colin Withers, he and the cafe proprietor exchanged greetings and then the proprietor proceeded to tell Colin in no uncertain terms what was wrong with the Villa's performance the previous Saturday, Colin listened intently and politely to every word.
Did he orginally play for Blues before moving to Villa?
Peg.