Author Topic: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.  (Read 2427 times)

Peg Monkey

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Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« on: June 09, 2019, 05:54:21 PM »
Salisbury Transmission Ltd., Birch Road, Witton, Birmingham 6. The company was established in 1939, an off-shoot of Salisbury Axle, USA and manufactured axles, differentials and gears for the automotive industry. It was originally part of the Birfield Group which included Hardy Spicer (Birmingham) and Laycock Engineering (Sheffield), the group was acquired by GKN in 1966. I started at the company in 1965 and there must have been 500 employees at the time, shortly after that an assembly factory was purchased at the top of Bromford Lane and then another on the Tyburn Road.  I worked at the company until 1974. The company is now known as Dana Traction Technologies (Europe). My association started with the company in June 1965.........
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2019, 06:16:17 PM »
.... My association started with the company in June 1965.........
Peg.
My introduction to the world of interviews was very much a baptism of fire when I applied for a Joseph Lucas Apprenticeship, the selection process consisted of a full day (9 until well past 5.00) of tests and interviews and I wasn't offered a place but I was then combat-ready for the next interview at Salisbury, thankfully it was a far more relaxed affair. The Asst. HR manager conducted the interview and he was so impressed with my work samples from my school metalwork classes that he invited his lady assistant in to the office to view my handywork. Sadly the only surviving item is a tea caddy spoon shown on the attachment, I've produced sketches representing some of the other items that I showed at the interview.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2019, 10:50:35 PM »
I got offered a 5 year Technical Apprenticeship subject to satisfactory CSE grades, these were due to be published sometime in August 1965. My Grade 4 maths was disappointing in the extreme but my grade 2s for technical drawing, metalwork and physics might have carried me through. The first year would be spent at the Birfield Apprentice School on the Hardy Spicer factory site, Chester Rd, Erdington starting September 1965.
Peg.


vamann

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2019, 08:43:10 PM »
We used to buy Dana Spicer ceramic clutches as replacement to the original non ceramic clutch.  Certainly lasted longer but flywheel faceplate wear was one of the drawbacks.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2019, 12:12:41 PM »
Birfield Apprentice School 1965-66. Based on the Hardy Spicer Factory Site, apprentices came from Birfield Group Companies all over the midlands, 4 others with me from Salisbury Transmission, most memorable thing was the mountain of jam donuts freshly baked in the Hardy Spicer canteen kitchen every morning and afternoon and served at the 10.00am and 3.00pm breaks.
Happy Days.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2019, 08:30:55 PM »
My year at the Apprentice School finished in September 1966 (or thereabouts) and then it was back to the main Salisbury Factory in Witton where I would spend the next 2 years working on the various sections of the factory, my first posting was on the Hub and Miscellaneous Line where I was assigned to a toolsetter......
Peg.
P.S. It was the dawn of The Mini Skirt, Ah! Happy Days!

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2019, 08:50:14 PM »
Salisbury Apprentices were required to act as factory tour guides - usually school parties.
Peg,

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2019, 04:57:49 PM »
I've always taken my full lunch-break entitlement, often going for a long walk sometimes eating my sandwiches on the way around, if the weather was bad I would still go out usually to a nearby cafe, one was on Witton island (we're now talking, I guess, c1973) which was about 10 mins or so walk from the factory, it was just a converted terraced house the front section having 4 or 5 tables and the same at the rear, the Villa ground was only minutes walk distant and I was enjoying a coffee in the front section one Monday, where the serving counter was, when who should walk in but the young talented Villa keeper Colin Withers, he and the cafe proprietor exchanged greetings and then the proprietor proceeded to tell Colin in no uncertain terms what was wrong with the Villa's performance the previous Saturday, Colin listened intently and politely to every word.
Did he orginally play for Blues before moving to Villa?
Peg.


Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2019, 03:26:54 PM »
When I left senior school in 1965 aged 16 I thought Great! No more school! Wrong, first day at the Birfield Apprentice School we were told You'll be enrolling on the Mechanical  Engineering Technicians Course, at Erdington Tech immediately.
The irony was 6 years of college lay ahead - longer than my 5 years at senior school!
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2019, 08:42:48 PM »
First day back at the Salisbury factory (1966) after my year at the Apprentice School, Hardy Spicer, I was recruited into the company football team, sadly I have to report it was a mediocre team achieving very little to rave about and I remember nothing about the matches except one for the wrong reason - I was well placed to attempt a shot at goal when the animal of a left back on the opposing side lunged at me making no attempt to go for the ball, he landed on my left leg and I still bear the scar today, how he escaped being sent off and us not being awarded a penalty I'll never know, my injury would have been a lot less serious had I been wearing shin guards - foolishly on that day I let style get in the way of good sense.
Our home ground was Barrows Lane, Yardley, which was a pig for me to get to from the Lyndhurst Estate, Erdington, on Sunday mornings until I got my motor bike.
Peg.

Peg Monkey

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Re: Salisbury Transmission Ltd.
« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2019, 05:19:35 PM »
The Yew Tree - was the closest pub to Salisbury, occupying a triangular plot where Birch Road joins the Brookvale Rd, the rear entrance faced the Salisbury main reception. Old maps show the pub in the middle of farmland and it looks as if it was accessed only by a track in the early days. I'm pleased to report the pub is still there even though it's surroundings have changed dramatically, it once had a small triangular bowls green to the south of the main building but that was changed duiring my time at Salisbury to a small carpark, which was used by Salisbury's managers. 
The pub was handy for a lunchtime drink on Christams Eve early finish, but my main recollection is not entirely positive, the old landlord (can't remember his name, but he looked like a Tom or a Burt) retired around 1970, he presided over great sandwiches - anything you like as long as it's cheese or ham, you were greeted by these made fresh every day, a mountain of each unwrapped and on huge trays behind the bar together with a massive bowl of prepared spannish onion, which was served loose in a white paper bag.
One lunchtime I crossed Birch Rd having already mentally chosen cheese and onion to be greeted by a fresh face behind the bar (who explained the old landlord had retired) and a sparkling new display case containing a wide variety of prepacked sanwiches, price? About 3 times previous cost.
Ah Well! That's progress.
Peg