Author Topic: Welcome to the world of ID cards  (Read 875 times)

john2000

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Welcome to the world of ID cards
« on: November 15, 2006, 03:08:13 PM »
I don't give a toss, who looks at my profile, lots of people moan about what people Will know about them, Briton has more police camera's spying on them an any other country in Europe, if for some reason you get stopped by the police they Will as for your ID, now if you're a villain they have you on file, but if you're just a normal person with nothing to hind why should you care about what other people know about you, most countries in Europe already have them, our driving license has a photo, and so does our ID card, which you have to renew every 5 -10 years, even our passport has one, its just one look at the photo and the person looking at it knows its you and it cant then be used by some other person, who calls them selves by your name,you go shopping, pay by credit card, the shop will ask you for an ID to prove its your credit card, and if its not, then you don't get  the pursue, ( and it maybe your credit card that has been stolen ) and its being used by some one else....think about it... ;D
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Jacqueline

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Re: Welcome to the world of ID cards
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2006, 03:33:10 PM »
John, i have no problem with cctv cameras or i.d cards. Why should i as i never break the law. ::)

What i do object to is the charges for such a card the government has mentioned. As much as 300 per person. What i object to even more is the fact that if you move address you need to pay again for a new card. THIS IS NOT ON.

Does our govenment want to keep us in boxes? What about students or backpackers?

The banks now want to impose charges for those with a balance less than 1,500. A TAX ON THE POOR OR WHAT. >:(

john2000

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Re: Welcome to the world of ID cards
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2006, 04:34:58 PM »
My god, I paid 40.- ( about 30 pounds) for my driving license, and nothing for my ID card only for the picture ( 10,- ).
I can understand why so many people are complaining about it, ( I would  too) its called legalized robbery, and I bet even then,  they don't get it right, it will cost more, and as far as banks go, they have always been a rip off, I don't know about the UK, but here in Holland they like you to pay by direct debit, when its a standard sum which never changes, like payment for the house, gas, electricity, and things like that OK, but if theres a hic-up somewere along the line, and some one had got the numbers wrong, or an error with the payment, they will take it out in one lump sum, and not tell you about it, until you see it on your  bank statement, so I stopped it and they have to send me the bill first then I will pay, that way I can control my funds, ( I used to pay about 25 pounds a month, for  a health system, then one day I saw that they had made an error, and took out all the money that they made an error on, putting me back about 800 pounds, and so from that day it was bill first then pay.
So what I'm trying to say is that when its automatic the bank dont have to employ more staff, and they make on that too,........... ;D
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Jacqueline

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Re: Welcome to the world of ID cards
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2006, 07:25:30 PM »
Oh gosh. Just watched the news. Our beloved queen has just given her speach to parliament and decided to do a trial of charges to drive the motorways.

Ha not it london but in the midlands on the M42 at around 1.34 a mile. I never travel on motorways but neither will anyone else. BIRMINGHAM WILL BE GRIDLOCKED. ???

Graham

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Re: Welcome to the world of ID cards
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2006, 08:37:04 PM »
In Belgium they have had ID cards ever since I have lived here, from 1967, and they cost now 5 (that is about 3,30).

If that is the price you have to pay in England then I would say get out or start a revolt! I too was against ID cards here in my new home country, why? I don't know I have nothing to hide, as you can see on this forum I even use my real name. All I know is that thousands of illegal immigrants had only one thing in mind, GET TO THE UK because there you didn't need any sort of ID once you were in the country. So ID cards for the UK are a real good thing, but not at that price, that is robbery. I see now that they are planning (highway) motorway robbery, god what a mess the country is getting into.

My first move abroad was to Holland and had register with the police. There I had to pay a deposit equal to the first class air fare back to England (England was not in the EEC then), if I had to be deported it wouldn't cost the Dutch people a cent. I had my money back on the day that I moved out of that country. I had no objection to paying the fare, even thought it a good idea, one that they should have done in England some 50 years ago.

I am very happy with the banks in Belgium, I pay a small sum of 6,50 (4,29) each month and they take care of all my banking business. Included in this price I get electronic home banking, two Visa cards, two bank cards and hundreds of other privileges such as restaurant and hotel discounts.

I shouldn't be telling you all this, we'll get swamped with Brummies!

kelama

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Re: Welcome to the world of ID cards
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2006, 10:08:12 PM »
Those of us who believe we have nothing to fear because we do not break the law should
perhaps be reminded that private conversations between like minded adults on "controversial"
subjects can get you a coupla years in Her Majesties slammer.

john2000

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Re: Welcome to the world of ID cards
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2006, 01:08:27 PM »
Kelama, my only fears are that some finger print expert, get it all wrong, and sends some poor sod away for something he/she didn't do, even tho they were no were near the crime area, at the time, and lots of people could prove they where not there, but because their "prints" were there, and because some "expert" said so.
there are lots of cases where people have gone down for something they didn't do, because of these "finger print experts "
One case stands out in my mind, was a police woman who was on duty one evening in Glasgow, two days later she was arrested for theft, because her "prints "where on a box in a house that was broken into, even tho she was on duty at police station 200 miles away at the time, she was looked down upon and her character went out the window, even tho she was a good police officer.. because of these finger print experts getting it all wrong.. ...  :o
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Jacqueline

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Re: Welcome to the world of ID cards
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2006, 03:11:50 PM »
I agree with your comments John and can give an example of raw justice from not too many years ago.

It was summer of 1989 and we had taken a family caravan holiday on the east coast. The holiday camp was heaving with brummies and black country folk.My twin son's were 14 and as far as i thought found a couple of friends and did what kids did. Yet i always kept tabs on them and told them to report back to us each half hour or so. Mainly that i could check they were safe.

Three months later in September when boys had reached 15 we had the police at the door. Turns out that my boys and three others had broken into an unused hut/caravan that once served tea's on the beachside. OK i was not proud of them but what followed was cruel.

They were taken to the local police station and questioned by a couple of cid who had driven from Skegness to interview them. Soon after my one son was released but other one detained for a couple of hours. When both returned they were questioned again by me...poor lambs ;D. They did not lie to me. Seems yes, there were five of them on the beach. Yes my boys, two from Scotland and a lad local..ish got into the van. My boys could not see the point and worried about reporting back left. As they were walking over the sand dunes they saw smoke and a fire. One of the other lads set it alight.

The local lad blamed first the Scottish then my son. Seems that cops would need extradition or something similar to bring the scots lads back.

So several court cases came up where we had to travel back to Lincs. The final [third i think] case hung on a telephone call to the fire brigade which the prosecution said was my son. A voice expert from Leeds university was called in. He listened to the interview tapes of my son and to the phone caller. He concluded that in two hours of conversation under interview with my son he never raised his voice to hysteria or even above calm. Yet the phone call was from an hysterical brummie. From this he decided my son might have been excited by the fire???
AND THE PLACE WAS FULL OF BRUMMIES ???

My son NEVER gets emotional.

Wanna know the daft bit? It was a juvenile court. Son was found guilty on flawed evidence and was fined the maximum. 100.

I dread to think of the costs with experts and travel to Brum plus my costs which were four times the fine with travel and accomodation. And what for??/ A DERILICT BEACH HUT.