Author Topic: DARWIN STREET  (Read 8827 times)

Phil

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2013, 12:38:15 PM »
Hi Red


Welcome to you, the information I have lists No 11 Darwin St as a fish & chip shop in 1950, a Mrs Rosa Pickering. Number 11 was at the bottom end of Darwin Street and was on the level ground as most of the rest was on the hill. The two photos I have of that end are one of the corner where you lived after it was demolished in 1958 and the other I'm assuming that it's roughly the same area because it also is on level ground.
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redflyingpig

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2013, 01:45:08 PM »
thanks for the quick reply and pics of 11 Darwin st. my mother Irene olive poulton took over the shop and ran it as a corner store until it was demolished we then bought a lock up store on Sandy lane. I remember a lot of the trade was done on the tick or slate meaning write it down and I will pay you later, years later I found notebooks full of these unpaid transactions.

redflyingpig

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2013, 01:59:29 PM »
Near Darwin st was a scrap dealer they dealt in old clothes and metal items . I once bought a ride on Muffin the mule metal toy from them, you sat on it and it would walk. Alan my brother and I had a cowboy and an indian set from there too, the indian set was a full suit made from sack cloth very itchy to wear. My mom would send us with a cart to pick up coal from the dealer up the road

Phil

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2013, 10:46:30 AM »
That would have most likely have been Charlie Kaey's near the junction of Dymoke St on Leopold St he was well known in the area and all the rag & bone ben used him.
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redflyingpig

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2013, 11:58:51 AM »
thank you, you have no idea the memories this stirs. Our main Sunday  afternoon entertainment was following a drunk guy home from the pub, he would stagger past our shop at 11 Darwin st and a bunch of us kids would fall in behind him. by the time he got home there would be about 9 or so kids behind him. The fun started when he opened the door, cries of  your drunk would be heard and then the pots and pans would start flying once i remember a window being broken. Out would stagger the poor guy and us kids would all scatter. There was a metal polishing shop off Darwin st too, they had a contract to polish the large Jaguars mounted on the front of the same named cars they also polished small horses heads mounted on a horseshoe and on round wooden bases

Actualiser

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2014, 12:13:01 PM »
Ive just joined the forum. My ancestors owned a pub at 162 Darwin Street (according to Census reports)  in 1860s called The Bell Tavern. Does anyone have any information about this pub? Did it become the Pheasant or is it the other pub on old maps, which appears to be in Stanhope Street?

Phil

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2014, 02:04:52 PM »
Hi Actualiser

Welcome to the forum, to start with I don't think the Bell Tavern was ever a full public house, it was only ever listed as a beer retailer in Kelly's Trade Directory's in this instance I take the definition of beer retailer to mean not holing a full licence to sell anything other than beers & porters. Sometime in the 30's it stopped being listed at all. Later in the 50's it was listed as a brass founders. It location was between Salop Street and Hollier St.

It would have been demolished in the 60's and replaced by Council Housing


In future you might find it better to confine your posts on the same subject to one thread, this will stop you getting answers spread over several different boards. With this in mind I will delete your other two posts, so that any further answers will all be made here.
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Actualiser

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2014, 06:37:10 PM »
Thanks for the information. That's some great research into the history. Could I just clarify some points. According to census records for the 1860s and 1870s the Bell Tavern my ancestors owned was at 162 Darwin Street. As Bell is a common name for a pub, could the one you mentioned be a different one? The family that owned it then consist of James William Edwards, as a Retail Brewer, in the 1860s. His wife takes over as Publican in the 1870s. Hope this information helps. A map of the area created around the time shows two pubs. One became the Peacock, so I assumed that either it used to be the Bell, or the other was the Bell. The trouble is I cant work out where 162 in Darwin Street would be. Could anyone shed light on where 162 is and whether the Bell was in Darwin Street as stated on the census records or elsewhere as you suggest? Thanks for any insights. Every little helps  :)

Phil

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2014, 07:04:10 PM »
Actualiser,

I am going by the actual address listing from  various Kelly's directories for 162 Darwin Street in various years. The earliest Kelly's I have shows listings for 1902 and that shows the address as a beer retailer. In subsequent directory's it is shown as a beer retailer and then the listing disappears for a while until it reappears as a brass foundry. It is never listed in Kelly's as The Bell Tavern

The thing is Kelly only list fully licenced public houses by name, beer houses are always listed by name of the owner.
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Actualiser

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2014, 08:15:37 PM »
Thanks Phil. That is interesting. Perhaps it was just a place that sold beer. Why they would do that when there's a pub on each corner I don't know! : )
But I've just been checking a few directories myself, and James William Edwards is listed in these as a beer retailer from the late 1840s until his wife takes over when he dies in 1860s. She continues to be listed as a beer retailer until the 1890s. In all directories their address is given as 162 Darwin Street. So this is almost certainly the place that Kelly's is referring too. It obviously carries on that business after my direct ancestors pass on.
I'm trying to visualise the premises. Do you think it would be more of a shop or a pub with limited licenses?
I wonder if anyone could pin point the building on the map. I do know that their daughter and husband lived at 163, which I imagine was attached to William and Martha's premises.
[size=78%]It's a shame it wasn't an old name for the peacock. I was there yesterday, taking loads of photos of it. Such is the trials of genealogy!  : )[/size]

mikejee

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Re: DARWIN STREET
« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2014, 12:09:30 AM »
Below is a map showing nos 162 & 163 in red and blue respectively. At that time there were many pubs and beerhouses, partly because for many that was the only source of entertainment (if they could afford it and often if they couldn't) The cost of a beerhouse licence , and the restrictions on having one, were much less than for a pub with a full licence. Beerhouses were originally introduced in an effort to reduce the consumption of spirits, the thought being that ease of getting a licence and , hopefully, low cost of the beer, which was then often brewed on the premises by the licensee, would reduce the attraction of the "gin palaces". this did work to a certain extent. They were often set up in just the front room of houses, though certainly by the time of the map below the building would seem to be larger than a typical house in the street, and the fact that they lived in a separate building would support it being much more than just a front room by that time