Author Topic: canal people. and canals  (Read 10933 times)

tramp

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #44 on: January 31, 2010, 05:27:50 PM »
Fred and Phil,
 
Thanks for these fine pictures of very different settings.
 
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frederick

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #45 on: January 31, 2010, 05:42:50 PM »
I don't know whether you know but canals are just 3ft deep and canal barges are 7ft wide because the locks are 15ft wide and that allows two barges to use a lock at the same time  :)
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guilbert53

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #46 on: January 31, 2010, 07:05:50 PM »
I don't know whether you know but canals are just 3ft deep and canal barges are 7ft wide because the locks are 15ft wide and that allows two barges to use a lock at the same time  :)

Not all canals are the same width or depth.
 
The Manchester Ship Canal is certainly not that deep or that wide.

tramp

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #47 on: January 31, 2010, 08:50:18 PM »
guilbert53,
 
Don't you reckon that Fred was referring to the generality of man-made inland waterways for barge traffic, not sea-going cargo boats....
 
You said ''The Manchester Ship Canal is certainly not that deep or that wide'',
nor are Suez and Panama.
 
Try reading this, and then again backwards:
 
                                  AMANAPLANACANALPANAMA
 
tramp (steamer) O0

frederick

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #48 on: January 31, 2010, 10:15:38 PM »
When you move onto river barges they are 9ft and over wide, with the canal barge there is only about a foot of it in the water and they have a flat bottom, i learnt all this of my brother who owned a canal barge for a few years and his son lives on one  O0
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roy one

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #49 on: January 31, 2010, 10:48:29 PM »
hi Fred thanks iv learnt some thing today i always called them narrow boats on canals
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john2000

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #50 on: January 31, 2010, 10:57:47 PM »
I knew a guy at Gas st, who put the top of a bus on a barge, and you know it looked great, he had to fiddle with it a bit but it looked great,
and every time I'm in Amsterdam and see the river boats, it always reminds of this guy....J2
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tramp

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #51 on: January 31, 2010, 11:05:02 PM »
Hey John,
 
That 'bus on a barge' sounds terrific!  I'd love to have seen it - imagine the clippie calling out, ''no more room inside, upstairs only - plenty of room on top" etc  :2funny:
 
tramp

frederick

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #52 on: February 01, 2010, 09:14:17 AM »
Roy,
I think they are the same thing this is from Wikipedia.
 
A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. Some barges are not self-propelled and need to be towed by tugboats or pushed by towboats. Canal barges, towed by draft animals on an adjacent towpath, contended with the
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roy one

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #53 on: February 01, 2010, 09:42:04 AM »
hi fred
            this is what made me think that they were called narrowboats 
 
 
 
 
Question book-new.svgThis article needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2007)
Modern narrowboats for leisure cruising,
Bugsworth Basin, Buxworth, Derbyshire, EnglandA narrowboat or narrow boat is a boat of a distinctive design, made to fit the narrow canals of England and Wales.
In the context of British Inland Waterways, "narrow boat" refers to the original working boats built in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries for carrying goods on the narrow canals (where locks and bridge holes would have a minimum width of 7 feet (2.1 m)). The term is extended to modern "narrowboats" used for recreation and occasionally as homes, whose design is an interpretation of the old boats for modern purposes and modern materials.
 
 
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john2000

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Re: canal people. and canals
« Reply #54 on: February 01, 2010, 01:35:10 PM »
In Sally Oak just after the bridge on the right from thown, was a guy who had bought some old army bridge pontoons made out of marinply, he sold one to me for 25 quid, I made a two birth boat out of it, with a small cooking stove, and a porta potty, I had just 3 ft to make a deck with, covered it with a frame and plywood and canvas, painted it blue and white, sold it for 150.pounds, it was 12 ft x 6 ft and 1.5 ft deep, I was going to put two together and make one long boat, but the guy had sold the lot with in  three weeks, and I could'nt find any more. there could have been a good business if I had stayed with it...J2..this was back in 1963..
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