Author Topic: schools and teachers in the 50s  (Read 15525 times)

roy one

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schools and teachers in the 50s
« on: July 04, 2010, 10:02:00 PM »
i will call it a misfortune but that's just me   i went in to a school last week and what i seen made me think of my time at school the only thing in common was it was called school
 
 
for me school started at 0900  if you was late it was the stick or lines  when some one come in to the class we stood up gum or sweets was a no no it was a bin job  we did not chat in class  to leave the class it was hand up and ask most of the male teacher was x  forces
 
 some was hard men they had seen and done things that at that time was not considered fit for a child to know about but some would tell you how things was in there time and history come to life when they told us you would not hear a sound no one would leave the room   in case they mist something for most time did not matter good teachers all of them
 
we had wood work metal work  the girls had cooking and needlework  girls had rounders or netball the lads football or what ever game the teacher was in to
 
we has 40 to a class one kid to a desk we kept our books and pens in that desk and no one would nick them
 
we did what we was told no ifs or buts
 
 
the school last week in the class if you could call it that it seemed that kids was in a gangs five or six to a table all shouting  and moving about some was eating some was playing with mobe phones the teacher seemed to move from table to table it seemed that each table was doing diffrent things  all the kids had one thing in common each had a big hold all with all there things in it 
 
it seemed that the kids could do just what they liked
 
 
 
how was thing in your school and do you think that the new way of teaching is better
each day is a blessing and I bless each day when it comes

tramp

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2010, 10:59:10 PM »
Roy,

I know we didn't, yet it sounds as if we went to the same schools.  10 years after leaving, a retired Headmaster said to me ''the value of a school is what's left when you've gone past all you learned in the classroom''....

tramp

Jacqueline

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2010, 12:40:11 AM »
Roy, I started school 1959/60 at Stirchley primary. Although i never had the cane for being late i do remember one evil teacher named Miss Wheel who would take delight to slap a 6 year old hands with a ruler for getting spellings wrong. And boy did it hurt.
 
Even up to when i left school in 1970 we would NEVER cheek the teacher. However i feel so sorry for the teachers now. They cannot even touch a child. EU regulations are mainly to blame for the wild kids who hold back the good kids who want to learn. >:(

phil48

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2010, 07:14:58 PM »
my first school was st clements highpark street from 1953/1957 approx, two teachers that stuck in my mind are miss beecroft who tried to teach me arithmitic without much success and miss jaques who was from the west indies and was my class teacher before i left and my family moved to kingshurst.
phil

roy one

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2010, 08:16:35 PM »
hi jacque
             one of my grandkids told me that in her last year at school it was hell she tells me that at that time there was a number of kids that was well behind in there school work in her class and she went on to say that any child that was doing well they would gang up on them and make life hard this was not only in school but out side of school she went on to say that this gang was thick they could not do much or know much and when they was given home work or project work to do it did not get done because going out at night was more important to them then they left school and she moved on to six form and all was OK she sees them around town now and then and the odd thing is most have got there own kids now
each day is a blessing and I bless each day when it comes

tramp

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2010, 06:28:14 PM »
I couldn't wait to be off to school in the morning  - it HAPPILY offered so much more than that house - and I got a free lunch.  On the other hand it had none if the negative drawbacks of that house.   For me school was excellent from every point of view.

In the last 2 years we had the same teacher, Mrs Phillips and that really helped.

Phil

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2010, 09:55:37 PM »
Yes thankfully some of the children want to do well at school my 10 year old grandson who will sit the entrance exam for King Edwards shortly and is expected to sail through has received a glowing report this year. I won't post the report just the headmasters comments at the end.
 
But the thing is that annoys me about state schools that they will not even consider preparing our children for things like this these days. If you think your child has the ability and you want him or her to try for something like this you have to make a cart load of fuss and pay for extra private tuition yourself. But believe me if your child passes and gains entrance then it is the school that will take all the kudos.
 
Phil
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tramp

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2010, 10:24:05 PM »
Phil,

I hope that he's successful - KES is still a very good school - it helped me a lot.

tramp

Jacqueline

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2010, 12:19:48 AM »
Going back to the late 60's when i came home from school. I would walk up Cartland Road and the kids from King Edward Camp Hill would pass me on their way home. Most were talking to themselves and i felt so sorry for them thinking they were pushed too hard at school.
I guess these guys became lawyers or better but their first years must have strung them out.

Phil

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2010, 09:37:06 AM »
Jacqueline
 
Yes things have certainly changed, we always took the mickey out of those pupils that attended the nearest Grammar school to us. Moseley Grammar I believe it was.
 
If I had got anything resembling a report as good as my grandson's topped off by similar remarks from the head. I would have been kicked all round the school. That would have been the teachers, before the pupils got their hands on me.
 
Phil
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frederick

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2010, 11:02:43 PM »
Thinks have changed i hear of kids just walking out of class and going home, a relative of ours works in a school at Tenby he sets the chemistry lessons for the teachers he said he wouldn't want to be a teacher he be able to stand whot the kids get up to now  :(
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