Author Topic: schools and teachers in the 50s  (Read 15527 times)

denise

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2010, 01:57:17 PM »
Phil...what a great report  :)

Steve

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2010, 09:32:16 PM »
My Granddaughter Katti moved into a new school just built, only it isn't a school, it's now an Academy which apparently isn't controlled by the council.
 The kids spend lots of time on computer terminals, Katti comes round and says to me "Can I do my homework on your 'puter Granddad?" Yes I say, 10 mins later she's on facebook. Must be faster via school website? I think I'm being conned.
 I assume they teach them proper English, but it seems that on Facebook proper spellings and phrasing are a no-no and some of the kids conversations are barely translateable IMAO. (Learned this bit -"In My Arrogant Opinion")
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

denise

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2010, 10:49:43 PM »
If you look at Samuel Johnsons dictionary and compare the language to now you will see how much it has changed.

Steve

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2010, 10:56:14 PM »
Madam, thou art most erudite
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

pickard.r

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #15 on: July 17, 2010, 11:34:52 AM »
ERUDITE? Thats a make of glue innit? :D


Bobby
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Phil

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2010, 01:33:45 PM »
I took my oldest grandson for a work placement interview yesterday. Something I do not agree with. I see it as an excuse for some firms to exploit free labour. When In started work my work experience was gained on the shop floor.
 
But its something they have to do now. For the life of me I can't see why as he will be going on to college.
 
In times past he would have spent the two weeks with me the same as my older granddaughters did.
 
But he got the placement, have you ever heard of anyone not getting a placement once they have gotten an interview. He was pleased with himself. I have told him the first time they put a broom in his hand and tell him to sweep up to ring me and I will come and bring him home.
 
Phil
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denise

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2010, 01:38:48 PM »
My eldest son did a work placement at the car factory in Washwood Heath.He is now 38.
 
He enjoyed it and the men he worked with had a collection for him so he come home with some money.Such a nice gesture I thought.
 
My lad is now a HGV mechanic and he rescues HGV's off the motorways and it is his own business.

Phil

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2010, 01:54:19 PM »
Where was that Denise LDV, I note it was the blokes that had the whip round.
 
I will admit that not all firms treat work experience students the same. Some can treat them quite well, but as a rule its the other way.
 
YTS schemes used to be another of my pet hates, a good idea used for the benefit of greedy bosses in other words a good Tory idea.
 
Phil
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denise

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2010, 07:12:38 PM »
Yes it was the blokes Phil,not the company  :)

Jacqueline

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2010, 12:26:43 AM »
 The work experience placement for my youngest daughter we requested that she should attend a local school for the deaf which was allowed. This was the school of her elder deaf sister. She did a great job and had a glowing reference.
 
 Considering she was bought up from birth with a deaf sister 7 years older than herself she became fluent in sign language. She applied for many jobs as interpretter with the courts, police etc and each time was told she was by far the best candidate but did not have a university diploma so they had to employ the candidate who was not so able.
 
She is now 25 and often called on to give a hand by various organisations which she does but this is for free.
 
Why does a piece of paper prove the best candidate.

tramp

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2010, 01:46:53 AM »
In '81/2 we were offered YTS youths.  When we asked to interview them wrt particular types of jobs and for their records, I was basically told ''not allowed to pick and choose''.  When I said that I wanted round pegs for round holes and that if they did well we'd take them off YTS and give them permanent jobs, the amazing response was ''not allowed, they must complete ''his/her specific YTS assignment' or they will be graded 'failed YTS - did not complete' ''....But we did it anyway, we moved 'em about until they found the right round hole - and we had ''new blood'' in the meat factory  ;D and the funeral dept ;D as well as the shops and stores.   The way round the interview was any obvious burke/jerk was told they'd be in embalming and the reaction was ALWAYS - no thanks. 

To the good ones that we gave a job, we said to tell them that they had stopped doing it (YTS) as they wanted something with a better future.  No lies by anyone, and the good young uns as happy as us.

So for us and over a dozen youths (m+f) YTS was mutually very good.  The ''odd'' thing was that the jobshop knew exactly what was going on, and pretended not to know - blooby daft.....but after all, it was that woman's govt ::)

I know that some outfits treated YTS as slave labour, broom handles and tea makers.  They should've been fined - but to create jobs for the young was way down the priority list - far, far below 'reducing unemployment figure'....sick cynical pollies.