Author Topic: schools and teachers in the 50s  (Read 15529 times)

john2000

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2010, 04:05:52 PM »
I dont think there are any photos of Hope St school, around the 50's, never saw any of them, but I do know there are a lot of photos hanging in the police station in Edward Rd, but then they built a new station on the corner of Belgrave Rd and Bristol Rd ( by the cinema), maybe they kept them and sent then there,? ..J2
PS: I do remember some one taking a group photo of us in Mary St school, ( 1945-1950 ), but never seen it, ( maybe I did but cant remember, I hate this getting old,) .... :-\
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rwmcgowan

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2010, 08:15:48 PM »
john 2000, have a photo of hope street football team , with pat roach in it , dont know whether it was taken in your time,  iwill try to copy it and post when it is ready , edward road is still open i believe , ithink most of the villains from hope street may have ended up at  mosely street , police house , remember the kellys out of hope street , the family ran a scrap yard , also jimmy rose, glad to see you back on the site , your post on egypt "first class rwm.

Phil

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2010, 08:36:50 PM »
John
 
I'm sure these have been on here before sometime, I might even have got them off here.
 
Phil
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john2000

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2010, 09:54:53 PM »
john 2000, have a photo of hope street football team , with pat roach in it , dont know whether it was taken in your time,  iwill try to copy it and post when it is ready , edward road is still open i believe , ithink most of the villains from hope street may have ended up at  mosely street , police house , remember the kellys out of hope street , the family ran a scrap yard , also jimmy rose, glad to see you back on the site , your post on egypt "first class rwm.

But do you remember the O'Brians, a little way down Hope street, on the left just across form that coal yard ( I think it was,? it was right next to the school playground,), they had a son and a daughter, the son was ok, but the daughter was somthing special in a class of her own, the name Pat Roach rings a bell, I cant put a face to the name, sad that, ( for me I mean,)  J2..
Growing old is mandatory..........Growing up is optional

Phil

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2010, 10:20:39 PM »
John
 
I would imagine the Pat Roach RWM is referring to is the ex wrestler turned film and TV star that died a few years back. He would have still been in the ring when you left the UK.
 
Best known for his portrayal of Bomber in the TV programme
Auf Wiedersehen, Pet
 
Phil
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john2000

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2010, 10:24:56 PM »
John
 
I would imagine the Pat Roach RWM is referring to is the ex wrestler turned film and TV star that died a few years back. He would have still been in the ring when you left the UK.
 
Best known for his portrayal of Bomber in the TV programme Aulf Ves

I remember a guy called Alain Bates, a heavy built guy, he wanted tobe a wrestler, nice fella, he even used to talk to me, I wonder if he made it..J2
Growing old is mandatory..........Growing up is optional

Boz

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2010, 03:22:48 PM »
I took my oldest grandson for a work placement interview yesterday. Something I do not agree with. I see it as an excuse for some firms to exploit free labour. When In started work my work experience was gained on the shop floor.
 
But its something they have to do now. For the life of me I can't see why as he will be going on to college.
 
In times past he would have spent the two weeks with me the same as my older granddaughters did.
 
But he got the placement, have you ever heard of anyone not getting a placement once they have gotten an interview. He was pleased with himself. I have told him the first time they put a broom in his hand and tell him to sweep up to ring me and I will come and bring him home.
 
Phil

I guess there's good and bad in any idea.
 
My grandaughter found her own work placement in a gym as she want to study sports science. They gave her a good two weeks of understanding about the industry and asked her to work a couple of hours each week to help out in reception after school.
 
Now she's at college doing her sports science course and working two evenings a week earning some money and they are paying for her training.
 
She's been really lucky, as it's a small gym but they have not taken advantage as a lot of employers do, offering a way forward in the future.

trapio

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2010, 05:19:49 PM »
Hello Boz,

That's very good to see from all sides and points of view.  It's good to read good news

There is nothing like being paid for doing what you enjoy (I am too) and your granddaughter is also getting the opportunity to apply what she learns.

She and the gym may well have a longer term relationship as well.....she'll certainly get a fine reference if or when she eventually goes her own way.

trapio
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Anne from Stirchley

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2011, 12:47:42 AM »
Roy, I started school 1959/60 at Stirchley primary.

Do you remember Mr. Lane, who was a complete sadist? He may even have been headmaster when you were there or maybe old Lubbock was still headmaster. I was born in 1951 and may have been there a little earlier than you. Mr. Lane was all about corporal punishment. You so did not want to get on his wrong side. He was particularly hard on some of the slower boys.
 
Do you remember Mrs Page who was tremendously pretty with long curly black hair?

Anne from Stirchley

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #31 on: February 07, 2011, 11:52:50 PM »
Going back to the late 60's when i came home from school. I would walk up Cartland Road and the kids from King Edward Camp Hill would pass me on their way home. Most were talking to themselves and i felt so sorry for them thinking they were pushed too hard at school.
I guess these guys became lawyers or better but their first years must have strung them out.

My middle brother went to this school and had a wonderful time there. His son is there now and my brother, though not a lawyer, is a Birmingham City councillor.

Jacqueline

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Re: schools and teachers in the 50s
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2011, 03:21:50 PM »
Anne,
   Have replied by PM.  God yes i remember Mr Lane. He seemed huge and terrified us when we were in the lower years. He would walk around at dinner time forceing kids to eat the stuff they hated. However when he was our teacher in our final year i found him fantastic. Yes he was a bit harder on the boys and yes Lubbuck was still headmaster.
  Many years later i took my first son to the school thinking of registering him. This thin old man who looked like Lubback sat there but when he spoke i realised he was Mr Lane. I decided against my son attending the school. Mainly considering the distance.