Author Topic: 60s Motorcycle dealers  (Read 26511 times)

DBD34

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #44 on: April 07, 2013, 11:04:22 AM »
Hl Phil, what is the parking situation like at the Black Country museum,unbelievably we have never been there but would like to. Was the place very packed with visitors as l don,t cope too well with claustrophobic situations. I know you can only comment on the day you were there but some idea of what to expect would be useful, thanks, Pete.

Phil

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #45 on: April 07, 2013, 11:27:26 AM »
Pete
 
I have been when it was that packed it took an hour just to get in. The last time the other day it was a cold day so it was pretty empty. It only took five minutes to get served in the fish & chips queue whereas I have give up waiting in the past and gone to the cafe.
 
I have never known the car park to be full, but there are others within walking distance. If you don't like crowds I would advise a weekday when there are no special attractions that day, you can always check out the website.
Make Love Not War

DBD34

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #46 on: April 07, 2013, 12:40:38 PM »
Thanks Phil, we would go on a weekday and of course of makes sense to check out there website, just thought l would get a bit of first hand knowledge, Pete

michael duffy

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2013, 01:15:40 PM »
can anybody remember bob joyner motor bikes

cocacolakid

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #48 on: April 08, 2013, 11:45:17 AM »
can anybody remember bob joyner motor bikes
I knew of Bob Joyner motorcycles, went past their shop a number of times, but never had any dealings with them.  Their shop was on the Wolverhampton Rd.
                                                                                                                              Malc.
Every day is a gift, that's why they call it the present.

cocacolakid

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #49 on: April 08, 2013, 11:54:53 AM »
Morning, Pete..
I haven't been to the Black Country Museum for many years,  however, I remember going on a nice day weather wise, It was not by any means over crowded, this was mid week. I think this is the best time to go, no kids as they are at school during term time. The museum covers a large area. Hope this helps a little.
 
                                                                                                                                  Malc.
Every day is a gift, that's why they call it the present.

DBD34

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #50 on: April 08, 2013, 12:21:02 PM »
Thanks Malc, that does help because as l said l don,t handle crowds of people too well, just one of those things l have to put up with. We will visit there on a weekday and hope it,s not too bad, appreciate your advice though, Pete

john edwards

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #51 on: April 08, 2013, 12:58:48 PM »
The first motorcycle dealer I remember was Bill Jukes (I think) by the Capital in Ward End. Used to look in on way home from school. I bought my first bike ( a Honda 50) from Shufflebottoms on Ladypool Road about 1964. Next bike was an Ariel Leader from Greys on Coventry Road then a BSA A50 from C & D in Acocks Green. That bike would be worth a lot today for the bike and number plate - one of the first batch - frame no. A50.150 and reg 81 JOE. Unfortunately it disappeared one night while I was watching the midnight movie at the ABC picture house in town. Aston Autos moved to Potters Hill when redevelopment went on and I exchanged the Suzuki 250 I had at the time for a Reliant Regal van.
Onslows on Stratford Road was a regular haunt - the best memory there was Mrs Onslow who seemed to have a ciggie permanently stuck to her bottom lip.
Night times were visits to the DZ (Double Zero) club in Heathmill Lane or Alex's coffee bar.
Used to be in the BSA owners club which met at the Navigation on Tyburn Road.
Still riding but these are happy memories

DBD34

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #52 on: April 08, 2013, 07:41:44 PM »
Hi John, never went to the Double Zero but obviously knew of the place. Alex,s hut was a must though at least3/4 nights a week, great meeting place and l have very happy memories of the characters there and the rides out to Stratford in the middle of the night, + the m/cycle cop on his Triumph Saint parked by the Albany waiting to give chase round Smallbrook Ringway, he loved it as much as we did, happy days. Pete.

brigham

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #53 on: April 09, 2013, 11:13:59 AM »
To DBD34,
Hi from Sydney. Yes I remember Alex,s hangout very well. I and my mates spent many evenings there
eating pies and drinking cups of hot tea and drooling over some of the best motorbikes i,d ever seen. I had to make do with a variety of BSA s and an Ariel 650 cafe racer(allshow and no go). We would then do the short run back to Kingstanding  and home. Thanks for the memories,
                                  Rod Brigham
 
 

brigham

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Re: 60s Motorcycle dealers
« Reply #54 on: April 09, 2013, 11:22:55 AM »
To John Edwards,
Hi John, greetings from Sydney. Yes I remember Alex,s pie caravan very well. See my replt to DBD34.
I also remember the Double Zero club. I was a member in the early 60,s until about 1965. I seem to remember it was run by a vicar, does the name David Collier mean anything to you? I think the meetings were held in the backstreets of Aston? although I could be wrong in that. I,m 70 now but still riding, I
own a BSA A10Rocket as well as a mod. Kawasaki. I remember those days well. I was a cabinet making app. and lived in Kingstanding until the mid.sixties
                                                       Rod Brigham