Author Topic: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940  (Read 26708 times)

Phil

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #55 on: November 28, 2012, 08:27:46 PM »
Dennis
 
I've never been in to genealogy so if the names do not come up within my living memory then they will mean nothing to me. Though it was Percy and Arthur Houghton that were the two gentlemen in question who were brothers and I would think both would have been born between 1900 and 1910.
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dennis houghton

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #56 on: November 30, 2012, 06:25:29 PM »
thanks phil i cant make a link to these names all i have to go on is amy houghton and william turner both from the area 1917

mikejee

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #57 on: November 30, 2012, 10:42:21 PM »
Dennis
Is it information after 1917 you require, or before ?

dennis houghton

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #58 on: December 01, 2012, 08:50:54 AM »
hi mike what im trying to find out is did robert monk houghton and his family live at number 8 angelina street in 1917 also william turner of 3bk of 86 stanhope street who married robert monk houghtons daughter amy on xmas day 1917 at the local church was williams mother alive not on wedding photos thanks dennis O0

mikejee

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #59 on: December 03, 2012, 12:16:38 PM »
Dennis
I tried to reply to your IM last night but got told you could not recieve messages. am therefore replying here.
 I cannot find a LindenTerrace in Grace Road. there is a Leicester place, Windley Place, White's Place and Belper Place. There was also a Linden Terrace in south road, not very far away. It is also possible that one of the other courts (listed in the rolls as courts) was at some time given that name. Also sometimes rows of houses in the street itself, other than terraces leading of the street, were named, the names being inscribed on the houses, but , as these also had street numbers, usually only the street numbers were recorded in directories or electoral rolls
Sorry i cannot be more help
Mike

Phil

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #60 on: December 03, 2012, 12:57:27 PM »
Dennis
 
Check out your forum profile messaging section to see if you haven't closed the receive all messages tag
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Donald F Butler

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #61 on: December 13, 2013, 09:18:34 PM »
phil.
I have not been to well of late lost the sight of left eye. I was keen to write to you about Loxley Avenue, were I lived at No5 from birth 1937 to 1951 when we had to move to William Henry Street, I wonder if you remember any of my family.Phiip Butler Edith, my mother, and Dad mom Charlotte Jennie Butler, and me Donald.

Donald F Butler

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #62 on: December 15, 2013, 01:00:29 PM »
Roy, when I was taken to my grans whilst my mom and dad, boozed in there old public haunts, om Balsall Heath, I would have to fetch Gran Jenny Russell, a jug of beer with a
towel cloth  over the top  to stop neighbors from seeing her habit. although I doubt it worked,


Grandad spent all his time outside the back door of 9 bk of 22 Vincent Parade tying to get his breath, after being gassed in WW1.


When we fetched our Toffee Apples off Ginnie, her fingers were black with the dirt from selling potatoes we would have to pick the dirt off ourselves, I dont ever remember us being ill. from the exercise.


Prov.[/size] No one can escape eating a certain amount of dirt on his or her food.; Everyone must endure a number of unpleasant things in his or her lifetime. (Often said to console someone who has eaten some dirt or had to endure something unpleasant.) [/size]Ellen: Oh, no! I forgot to wash this apple before I took a bite out of it. Fred: You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die.[/i][/font][/size]

[/i][/font][/size]
This was in the war years for I was about 7. [/i][/font][/size]

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I wish my grand Kids could be so happy. [/i][/font][/size]

[/i][/font][/size]
Don[/i][/font][/size]

roy one

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #63 on: December 15, 2013, 01:15:43 PM »
anggelina street was home to me mom and I moved there to live with moms sister  I lived by the black patch by a shop called luckets and a coal yard

until mom got her own house two up two down a shop down the road on the corner was a fruit shop we called dolly dings home made toffee on a stick was the best thing for pulling your teeth out O0 ;D but looking back now she was a dirty old so and so ;D ;D ;D
each day is a blessing and I bless each day when it comes

Donald F Butler

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #64 on: December 16, 2013, 10:19:26 PM »
Shellie


Great to hear from you, I was about to explain what a great mad your granddad Billy was,
he would come to  5 Loxley venue Warstock when on leave from the Navy, he looked great in his uniform and you may not have remembered the song,
"All the nice Girls lover a Sailor" well your Gran Joan is certainly an NICe girl.


My mother Edith was so proud of Billy for he was on the HMS Hood.
Every time he came to the house Philip my dad would take him upstairs and on his wardrobe were many shoe boxes full of money,  and he would always give Bill a 5 note.  O am not sure why Billy wasnt on board when The Hood was sunk with many 100s of sailors killed.


When ever I asked about the shop he would just look sky wards and ignore me,


I was only about 5 but when I was much older and read about the shop I understood.


A great fisherman, I would make him laugh, by striking like a mad man when ever the flout went down. I dont ever remember catching many fish yer Billy taught my Brother Phil. and he was a great fisherman also.


Bill was also a great darts player. and ciould have been a pro although there was no money in the game in the 50s.


Ive still got one of his little seats that he made for my kids.


RIP Billy and all my love to Joan and all the rest of the Russells, and all other off shoots,


Don.  :)

Donald F Butler

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Re: Angelina street and William Henry Street 1940
« Reply #65 on: December 16, 2013, 10:25:26 PM »
Billy Russell. [/size]
When war with Germany was declared Hood was operating in the area around Iceland, and she spent the next several months hunting between Iceland and the Norwegian Sea for German commerce raiders and blockade runners. After a brief overhaul of her propulsion system, she sailed as the flagship of Force H, and participated in the destruction of the French Fleet at Mers-el-Kebir. Relieved as flagship of Force H, Hood was dispatched to Scapa Flow, and operated in the area as a convoy escort and later as a defence against a potential German invasion fleet. In May 1941, she and the battleship Prince of Wales were ordered to intercept the German battleship Bismarck and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, which were en route to the Atlantic where they were to attack convoys. On 24 May 1941, early in the Battle of the Denmark Strait, Hoodwas struck by several German shells and exploded; the loss had a profound effect on the British people.[/size]
The Royal Navy conducted two inquiries into the reasons for the ship's quick demise. The first, held very quickly after the ship's loss, concluded that Hood's aft magazine had exploded after one of Bismarck's shells penetrated the ship's armour. A second inquiry was held after complaints that the first board had failed to consider alternative explanations, such as an explosion of the ship's torpedoes. It was more thorough than the first board, and concurred with the first board's conclusion. Despite the official explanation, some historians continued to believe that the torpedoes caused the ship's loss while others proposed an accidental explosion inside one of the ship's gun turrets that reached down into the magazine. Other historians have focused on the cause of the magazine explosion. The discovery of the ship's wreck in 2001 confirmed the conclusion of both boards, although the exact reason why the magazines detonated will always be a mystery, as that area of the ship was entirely destroyed in the explosion.[/size]


 

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